Choosing the “Write” Pen Types

Handwriting Tools of the Trade - National Pen

Handwriting Tools of the Trade – National Pen

With so many different pen types and labels, choosing the right pen is actually a lot harder than it seems. It’s more than just randomly choosing something to write with. In addition to the pen itself, you also have to decide on the point size, type of ink, and color options. These characteristics can help enhance your overall writing experience with a particular pen. If you’re looking for a new go-to pen that fits your personal writing style and needs, here are a couple pen types to consider.

Ballpoint Pens

Ballpoint pens are one of the most common and well-known pen types. The ink used in ballpoint pens is oil based and dries faster than other types of ink. This means less smudging when you’re writing. Since the ink is thick, ballpoint pens use less ink as you write, lasting longer than other pen types. Another point to consider: thick ink is more prone to clumping, so you have to apply more writing pressure. As a result, these pens aren’t the best choice for long writing. But, if you’re just looking for a simple pen for everyday use, ballpoint pens are an easy and reliable option.

Rollerball Pens

Rollerball pens use the same design as ballpoint pens but with water-based ink. Water-based ink flows faster and soaks into the paper more than ballpoint pen ink. The ease of flow requires less pressure and creates a smooth, comfortable writing experience. And, because the ink flows so smoothly, rollerball pens are ideal for writing text with dark and fine lines. They also come in a wider range of colors because they use water-soluble dyes. If you need to write for a long period of time, use a rollerball, but make sure to refill the ink often since they use more ink than other pen types.

Gel Pens

Gel pens combine characteristics from ballpoint and rollerball pens. They use water-based gel ink that has a consistency between both types of ink. This makes the ink less likely to smudge but still flows freely enough for smooth writing. As a result, gel pens offer the comfort of rollerball pens, with the performance of ballpoint pens. And, since they use pigments instead of regular dyes, gel pens are also available in a variety of colors. If you want to make a bold statement but still expect reliability, gel pens are a great choice.

Marker Pens

Marker pens come in four types of ink: pigment, water, oil and alcohol-based. Pigment and water-based inks are for traditional paper. On the other hand, oil and alcohol-based inks are for non-paper media (e.g. plastic, metal, or glass). These pens include permanent markers, non-permanent markers (e.g. dry erase markers), highlighters, and porous point (or felt tip) pens. With such a wide variety of point sizes, colors, and types, marker pens work great for both writers and artists alike. If you’re looking to add a splash of color to any of your projects, marker pens are the right choice for you.